Guidelines for the use of

Focusing-Oriented Expressive Arts (FOAT®)

For Certified FOAT® Facilitator or Practitioner;

And/or Certified Focusing Trainer: Specialization in FOAT®

1.       This training is in Focusing-Oriented Expressive Arts. The term “Focusing-Oriented Expressive Arts” (FOAT®) can be

used in both clinical and non-clinical applications. Please note: This phrase does NOT have the word “therapy” in it.

2.      It is important to understand the terminology:

     a. Focusing-Oriented Expressive Arts (FOAT®) is an integration of one or more of the expressive arts modalities (i.e.

art, dance-movement, writing, drama, music, etc.).  It is an umbrella term for both clinical and non-clinical applications.

 

This term, phrase and acronym can and should be used to describe what you are learning or providing to others as a Certified FOAT® Facilitator or Practitioner; or Certified Focusing Trainer (FOT or Professional): Specialization in FOAT®.  

 

IMPORTANT: This does NOT have the word “Therapy” in it.  This phrase is the correct phrase and acronym for everyone in the Focusing-Oriented Expressive Arts Trainings. There are only certain situations that the word “therapy” can be used. See “b” and “c” below.

     b. Focusing-Oriented Art Therapy (FOAT®) is a professional application of the integration of Focusing and Art Therapy

developed by Dr. Laury Rappaport. Only professionally trained art therapists with a graduate degree in Art Therapy should use this term; otherwise people may think you have professional training as an art therapist - which would be misleading - and therefore unethical. 

 

If you have been trained in an Institute or similar program, then it is more accurate to describe that you have a degree in ____ with additional institute training in art therapy (or certificate in art therapy). The same applies to all of the arts - music therapy, psychodrama, drama therapy, poetry therapy, etc.

     c. Focusing-Oriented Expressive Arts Therapy (FOAT®) is a professional application of the integration of Focusing and

Art Therapy developed by Dr. Laury Rappaport. Only professionally trained art therapists with a graduate degree in Art Therapy should use this term; otherwise people may think you have professional training as an art therapist - which would be misleading - and therefore unethical. 

 

If you have been trained in an Institute or similar program, then it is more accurate to describe that you have a degree in ____ with additional institute training in art therapy (or certificate in art therapy). The same applies to all of the arts - music therapy, psychodrama, drama therapy, poetry therapy, etc.

 

 

3.      Note: The trainings offered in Focusing-Oriented Expressive Arts (FOAT®) are not training to be a psychotherapist or

expressive arts therapist. It is about integrating Focusing and expressive arts and their unique combination into your setting (which can be psychotherapy, social work, education, coaching, wellness, personal growth, arts, etc.). You can only call yourself an "Expressive Arts Therapist" (or other Arts Therapist) or psychotherapist only if you have the proper training.  In the U.S., one needs to have a Master’s Degree in Expressive Arts Therapy, Art Therapy, Music Therapy, Drama Therapy, Dance Therapy, etc. 

 

Therefore, completing a certification program in Focusing-Oriented Expressive Arts allows you to tell it as it is: you are trained in Focusing-Oriented Expressive Arts (FOAT®) and integrate that into your profession or non-clinical application. 

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